Alpha Monocerotids didn’t really live up to the hype

Last month, there was the prediction of a beautiful Alpha Monocerotids meteor shower. But, the weak shower left many disappointed.

The prediction was shared by scientists from the SETI Institute and NASA’s Ames Research Center who along with other fellows calculated the estimated time and distance of the outburst. The provided time was 11:50 pm ET (or 04:50 UT) and the shower was predicted to be the brightest at 15 minutes. The total expected time was 40 minutes. The best views were thought to be in South America, Western Europe, etc.

The first time the Alpha Monocerotids was observed in 1925 in Virginia. Witnesses saw “three bright meteors” within a minute and noticed and marked its location around the Orion constellation. It was later observed in 1935 in India and almost 100 meteors were counted in a span of around half an hour. And they have observed quite sometimes in the skies around the world.

Here are some images of the shower.

 Michael Boyle Sr. caught an Alpha Monocerotid speeding through Orion.
Michael Boyle Sr. caught an Alpha Monocerotid speeding through Orion.
The shower reflecting on a lake. Credit: Bob King.
The shower reflecting on a lake. Credit: Bob King.
Alpha Monocerotids shining through the sky
Alpha Monocerotids shining through the sky. Credit: Greg Hogan in Kathleen.

Also Read: The Last Cold Moon of The Decade

Please follow and like us:
error

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *